Managing uncertainty and probability in BD&L Marketing Research

Healthcare products companies of all sizes flourish or fade based on their ability to build robust portfolios by acquiring high-value assets and culling low-level ones. In 2015, there were 468 announced deals involving therapeutic drug assets, devices, diagnostics and insurance companies, according to data from Thomson Reuters, representing a 10% increase over 2014 and a 90% increase over 2012. This extends a trend of an increasing number of deals, beginning in 2013 after a sustained decrease during the economic downturn around 2008.

Read More

Contracting Beyond Rebates and Discounts

As provider reimbursement systems move toward compensation for success rather than service, some health plans are encouraging manufacturers to take on some of the market risks for new agents in exchange for preferential management. As pharmaceutical companies seek to develop new and successful market access strategies, they should proactively approach certain types of plans with offers of performance-based contracts.

Read More

It Took Twenty Years to Become an Overnight Sensation

At a Spring PMRG meeting, the highest rated presentation, given before a standing-room-only audience, debuted a new mode of marketing research called patient simulation. The presentation focused on how this method provided more reliable data than traditional allocation and estimation methods and improved response and interview completion rates dramatically. If you were at PMRG CONNECT 2016 […]

Read More

Can Patient Chart Pulls Help Predict Physician Behavior?

Welcome back to my three-part series on physician treatment behavior. If you missed the first installment, you can find it here. In this second installment, I will be discussing the use of patient chart pulls as a way to understand both current and future physician prescribing. Patient chart pulls offer significant advantages to allocation studies, […]

Read More

Estimating physician treatment behavior with allocation – we can do better!

This is the first installment of a three-part series where I will be exploring methods of estimating physician treatment behavior. I’ll be looking at three common approaches used in healthcare market research: patient allocations, patient chart pulls, and patient simulation studies – and exploring the trade-offs associated with each. Predicting how physicians will act in […]

Read More

Can Qualitative Research Be Used to Detect Segments?

Many factors determine sample size for qualitative research. They usually include practical considerations such as size of budget, number of unique groups being interviewed and in the case of in-person, the number of cities in which interviews are being conducted. They may also include subjective “comfort” factors such as what has been done in the […]

Read More

Driving the Right Decisions: Three Steps

Marketing Research provides the greatest benefit to internal stakeholders when it helps them “predict the future.” Predicting the future can involve answering several very different kinds of questions. For example, “How should I develop this asset?” “Should I acquire a competitor?” “Which message or campaign will achieve the highest market share?” and “Who in my […]

Read More

So Why Do We Need Surveys Anyway?

Within the sphere of marketing research activities today, few have lower prestige than the simple survey. If you read the blogosphere, you see questions asking whether primary marketing research will be dead in 10 years (or maybe 5), whether Big Data will eliminate the need for surveys completely, and whether traditional “data collection” has a […]

Read More

Failure is not an option

In his most recent post, RG+A’s CEO Roger Green discussed the marketing research industry’s identity crisis. Regardless of what we call it – business intelligence, customer advocacy, decision support – the fact of the matter is that the needs and expectations of marketing research’s customers have evolved, and we as an industry need to evolve […]

Read More

Telling Suppliers Your Project Budget

There seems to be an unwritten rule that says you should never share your project budget with a market research supplier. It probably derives from a concern that letting suppliers know your budget is an invitation for them to take advantage of you. You will end up with three bids all on or near your […]

Read More